Archive

Wednesday
Nov092016

David Archuleta - Nunca Pense'

November 2014 

Kaleidescope Pictures

This was a real challenge. Some of the actors needed to be in black and white sepia tones to show they were ancestors. To create the effect I used the Key Mixer and a complex node tree to isolate certain parts of the frame and get individual frame by frame rotoscoped control so that the overlapping selections would line up and apply my "sepia grade" to the entire individual wherever they moved and to match to the movement of the camera which as you'll see is entirely handheld. The hardest part to make work was the drumming hands in some shots. With fast blurred movement like that the selection has to be feathered so that just enough of the edge is sepia without the visible background haloing sepia too much. Contract the selection too far and the color in thier fingers shows. So it was complicated and tedious, but it worked better than I expected I could make it work. 

Tuesday
Jul192016

Fanta Theater spot

July 2016

Scott Winn

Tuesday
Jun142016

America First Credit Union Zombie Ads

February 2016 - America First Credit Union

Mark Fletcher

Mighty Clever

Here's the ad itself.

and here's another one I did in February of 2015.

Thursday
May262016

Tuning up 360 degree video

This is part of a series from Camp 4 Collective. 360 video is a whole different animal to grade. Planning a workflow that will maintain the correct aspect and get everything back to its pixel for pixel location is thicker than I thought it'd be. You have to copy and paste each shot to double them up in the timeline, then reposition each doubled clip to see how the left and right edges are matching. Then you have to work from only one side at a time and any changes you make to one must be copied, pasted, and repositioned back to the right or left to continue adding new nodes to the "working" clip. It's thick. I've been learning a lot from these though and I wanted to at least show some of the kinds of things I've had to do to make a project like this match. It's one thing to match picture from camera to camera at a cut. It's something else completely to match 16 cameras together in the same composition. And on this particular rig every camera has to ride on auto settings so once you lock that down, it changes. Lots of keyframing. It's giving me superpowers though when it comes to going back to traditional framed composition cutting from one clip to another. 

Tuesday
Mar082016

A Trip to Unicorn Island

Scott Winn

Dec 2015

This was an exciting project to be a part of. Some behind the scenes of the Red Carpet Premiere can be seen here:

One of the challenges to documentary filming verses controlled production is the wilderness it has to be shot in. Compared with the changes in lighting to be dealt with in a regular project, documentary has thousands of different room tones and locations to match. Every space, outdoor, indoor, in cars, on stage, in hallways, all require their own consistency. The raw clips from the cameras come in with all their own flavoring. My job is to tie all that together so the audience's eyes travel smoothly over every cut. That variety is sometimes difficult to piece together. It's a long process comparing clips from the same locations at different points in the timeline to unlock the look of each space. Some cameras have a tendancy to take skin tones very yellow or green so there's that to contend with as well. Alltogether, I'm very proud of what I was able to pull off, and more than that, grateful that I got to be included in this. 

Here are some before and after clips from the film with some commentary on the process. Not sure how I feel about my voice over, but it'll have to do. Time is pretty limited. I haven't had a chance to write a post like this in a while. 

Mostly I really wanted to write a few words about this project because it was such a huge endeavor for everyone involved, and such a great success. I'm glad I could be part of the process.