Archive

Entries in color correction (37)

Thursday
Jan162014

Clash of Clans 

Directed by A. Todd Smith 

Here are some of my favorite before and after stills from the project. I've also created a short grade breakdown below. The grade needed to add drama and gravity to the footage. I referenced stills pulled from the movie 300 to try and build contrast and tension. The shadows were pretty crushed. In a few cases like with the dark hair of the maiden clapping at the tree and the dark furs on the giant's shoulders, I needed to track some selections to lift the detail back into the shots. 

Image #4 is very very blue as a result of being shot so late in the evening. They're riding the very last ounces of light in that shot and hopes weren't too high that I could get much out of it. So I tried to warm it up, but it just wasn't working as well as I'd have liked. A lot of times you can resurrect data that looks lost in a shot, but low light situations are trouble because there just isn't anything hitting the sensor. So you can brighten it, you can warm it, but it stays colorcast and it doesn't retain the contrast information you need. The only way to get it to work is by selecting specific elements of the frame, tracking them to the image, and building it up artificially. Numbers 18 and 19 are also a good example of building up color and contrast artificailly. 

 

 

Monday
Oct142013

Generation 

This was a short film for the Imagin8ion Project set up by Canon. Here's a short blip about it from Ron Howard.

You can watch GENERATION in its entirety on the project imagination website at this link:

https://www.longliveimagination.com/gallery/video/715

 

These are some of my favorite shots.

These are the stills it was inspired from.

 

 

Monday
Sep092013

Virgin Mobile

Directed by Derek Pueblo, and shot by Jeff Yeats, This piece required special attention to create the different worlds of each scene. It's a little different, but here are some before and after shots of the work I did on it. 

Monday
Sep092013

Ford Longboarding Adventure

 Created by Devin Graham

Music By Scott and Bredno

Tuesday
Jul302013

Splinter Cell Blacklist

.
 From Scott Winn, Christian Busath and a whole bunch of other really talented people you can see in the behind the scenes video, comes this little project that was just a kick to work on. 
I'll start with these exterior shots because relighting wide exterior shots is one of my favorite grades to build. The guys at CineChopper captured some beautiful stuff on this project. The first one here features our man, Sam Fisher walking up the middle of a bombed out village in Eastern Europe somewhere. It's evening and the sun is coming in at a good angle. I used a lot of tracked windows and selections to pump the focus toward Sam. There's also a selection on the bottom edge of the horizon only effecting the sky that brightens it up drawing your eye out into the distance. I've used the same technique to draw your eye out and across the shot in these others to get the focus out there on the horizon, watching for what's coming. As you click through these stills you'll see what I'm talking about.
.
There was some archival footage of the presidents being sworn in that needed a little adjustment to get the VHS tone consistent. But playing some of the other archival shots plain Jane just wasn't working. They needed some drama. So I pushed them to night.
.
The first close up shots of Sam Fisher needed to feel dangerous. To create the look I pulled out what little warmth was in the shot, and tracked windows to his face relighting it subtly to let one side if his face fall into shadow. There's even a small highlight to pump up the glint in his left eye. 
.
The opening shot was feeling a little too blue and black in my first grade. In all the reference images there was some contrasting color in the lights. So I went back in and added some yellow to the florescents to give it a less monochromatic feel. The final shot was this interrogation shot with fairly even lighting. I brought the light forward in the room and made it more sourcey to increase the dramatic feel, but also to get your attention over on them so his fall would be more jarring. There's a few windows there and some big shifts in the color to get it matching everything else. 
These last bunch of stills include the explosion which was shot simultaneously on a few different camera systems. Each type of sensor responds differently to what's in front of it. I believe this sequence of shots come from the Red Epic, Canon 5D mark iii, and the Phantom which always captures more green in the highlights than the others. To match them, I had to go in and isolate the highlights inside the blast and tilt them back so it wouldn't feel like each shot was from a different take or a different explosion.
 My mission with the rest of the shots in the sequence was to create a consistent cinematic look that would create a feeling of anticipation.