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Entries in Davinci Resolve (22)

Saturday
Mar282015

Strapless Kite Surfing - Niccolo Porcella

Finished September 4th, 2014

Directed by Kevin Winzeler

Contour Team Athlete: Niccolo Porcella - Strapless Kitesurfing from Contour_cam on Vimeo.

 

Tuesday
Apr292014

EnVE M-Series

Kevin Winzeler contacted me back in Jaunary to begin testing some images in preparation for a project he had coming up.
This was it.

ENVE M-SERIES from ENVE Composites on Vimeo.

It's a mix of Canon 1DC, 5D, GoPro, and Sony FS700 footage. The 1DC gets some beautiful results so that was the witness camera all the others needed pushed to match. Sony S-log is crazy flat and the captured spectrum isn't as wide so getting them to match required injecting color back in where the 1DC showed more vibrant color.

In the stills below there's also a shot of a red rim that needed to be green to match the location one. It began with a rack focus too so it took some careful blurring and keyframed selections to make it work. Anyway, have a look.

Thursday
Jan162014

Clash of Clans 

Directed by A. Todd Smith 

Here are some of my favorite before and after stills from the project. I've also created a short grade breakdown below. The grade needed to add drama and gravity to the footage. I referenced stills pulled from the movie 300 to try and build contrast and tension. The shadows were pretty crushed. In a few cases like with the dark hair of the maiden clapping at the tree and the dark furs on the giant's shoulders, I needed to track some selections to lift the detail back into the shots. 

Image #4 is very very blue as a result of being shot so late in the evening. They're riding the very last ounces of light in that shot and hopes weren't too high that I could get much out of it. So I tried to warm it up, but it just wasn't working as well as I'd have liked. A lot of times you can resurrect data that looks lost in a shot, but low light situations are trouble because there just isn't anything hitting the sensor. So you can brighten it, you can warm it, but it stays colorcast and it doesn't retain the contrast information you need. The only way to get it to work is by selecting specific elements of the frame, tracking them to the image, and building it up artificially. Numbers 18 and 19 are also a good example of building up color and contrast artificailly. 

 

 

Tuesday
Jan142014

Bryan Walters

 directed by Alec Throsen

This short needed a softer, lower contrast feel than what digital typically offers. I used a series of selections to isolate shadows and highlights to soften the curve without losing balance or detail. The look has almost a beer bottle effect on the footage- the feel of greenish tinted glass, but not the smooth machined finish; the lumpy organic poured molten glass feel. The look needed to evolve progressivly till the ending scene where a more natural tone would replace the amber and greens. Another interesting part was a scene that needed to look like twilight right after sunset even though it was shot in late evening.

For more information about the film here is a link to it on IMDB http://www.imdb.com/title/tt3053454/

Here are some before and after stills.

 

And here is a video highlighting that twilight transformation. 

Monday
Sep092013

Hilary Weeks - Say Love

I worked with Bentley Media Group on this one. 

The main performance scenes needed a bright warm look. They included the outdoor footage with the lens flares and the notes as well as the sunset with the city skyline. The day they shot the sunset a brush fire had covered most of the western sky with smoke so the light was even more orange and diffused than usual. Really beautiful! 

For the story peices we went with a warmed up low contrast look with milkier blacks than what the camera captures. This gave a soft seperation between the story footage and the performance footage.

There were a few lighting details to enhance in one of the set ups where the key light just needed a little more oomph. It turned out well. Mostly subtle stuff so I'll just post a few stills.